Rogue popular One: new arrival A Star Wars Story online

Rogue popular One: new arrival A Star Wars Story online

Rogue popular One: new arrival A Star Wars Story online

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Product Description

NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER • Go beyond the film with a novelization featuring new scenes and expanded material.

As the shadows of the Empire loom ever larger across the galaxy, so do deeply troubling rumors. The Rebellion has learned of a sinister Imperial plot to bring entire worlds to their knees. Deep in Empire-dominated space, a machine of unimaginable destructive power is nearing completion. A weapon too terrifying to contemplate . . . and a threat that may be too great to overcome.

If the worlds at the Empire’s mercy stand any chance, it lies with an unlikely band of allies: Jyn Erso, a resourceful young woman seeking vengeance; Cassian Andor, a war-weary rebel commander; Bodhi Rook, a defector from the Empire’s military; Chirrut Îmwe, a blind holy man and his crack-shot companion, Baze Malbus; and K-2SO, a deadly Imperial droid turned against its former masters. In their hands rests the new hope that could turn the tide toward a crucial Rebellion victory—if only they can capture the plans to the Empire’s new weapon.

But even as they race toward their dangerous goal, the specter of their ultimate enemy—a monstrous world unto itself—darkens the skies. Waiting to herald the Empire’s brutal reign with a burst of annihilation worthy of its dreaded name: Death Star.

Praise for Rogue One: A Star Wars Story

“One of the best movie adaptations yet.” Cinelinx

Rogue One bridged characters and elements of the prequels and original Star Wars trilogy in a visually stunning ride, but there are even more rich details hiding in the film’s novelization, [which] reveals and expands with inner monologues and character insights, political knots, and nuance.” —The Daily Dot

Rogue One: A Star Wars Story novelization deepens a tale of hope. . . . [Jyn Erso] proves to be even more fascinating here than she was in the movie.” —New York Daily News

Review

“One of the best movie adaptations yet.” Cinelinx

Rogue One bridged characters and elements of the prequels and original  Star Wars trilogy in a visually stunning ride, but there are even more rich details hiding in the film’s novelization, [which] reveals and expands with inner monologues and character insights, political knots, and nuance.” —The Daily Dot

Rogue One: A Star Wars Story novelization deepens a tale of hope. . . . [Jyn Erso] proves to be even more fascinating here than she was in the movie.” —New York Daily News

About the Author

Alexander Freed is the author of Star Wars: Battlefront: Twilight Company and Star Wars: The Old Republic: The Lost Suns and has written many short stories, comic books, and videogames. Born near Philadelphia, he endeavors to bring the city’s dour charm with him to his current home of Austin, Texas.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

Galen Erso was not a good farmer. That was only one of his many flaws, but it was the reason he was still alive.
 
A man of more diverse talents—a different Galen, a Galen who could intuit what colonial crops would thrive in an alien world’s soil, or who could check a withered tree for rot without peeling away its bark—would have grown bored. His mind, left idle in the fields, would have returned to subjects he had forsworn. That Galen, consciously or by habit, would have sought out the very work that had driven him to exile. He would have stared into the hearts of stars and formulated theorems of cosmic significance.
 
In time, he would have drawn attention. His obsessions would surely have killed him.
 
Yet an unskilled farmer was anything but idle; so the true Galen, the one who inhabited the realm of reality instead of idle fantasy, had no trouble filling his days on Lah’mu without succumbing to temptation. He took bacterial samples off boulders left by prehistoric volcanoes and looked in awe at the evergreen moss and grass and weeds that seemed to sprout from every surface. He surveyed the endless crooked hills of his domain, and he was grateful that he had yet to master his new profession.
 
He constructed these thoughts like an equation as he looked out the window, past his orderly rows of budding skycorn and toward the black soil of the beach. A tiny girl played near the rows, sending her toy soldier on adventures in the dirt.
 
“Is she digging again? I swear she didn’t learn the words strip-mining from me, but we’re going hungry next year if she keeps this up.”
 
The words breached Galen’s concentration slowly. When he heard them, understood them, he smiled and shook his head. “The agricultural droids will repair the damage. Leave her be.”
 
“Oh, I never planned to do anything. That girl is all yours.”
 
Galen turned. Lyra’s lips curled until she smiled. She’d started smiling again the day they’d left Coruscant.
 
He began to reply when the sky rumbled with a boom unlike thunder. One portion of Galen’s mind narrowed its focus and was aware of only his wife before him, his daughter on the beach. The other portion processed the situation with mechanical precision. He was walking without conscious intent, striding past Lyra and the cluttered kitchen table and the worn couch that reeked of clove after- shave. He passed through a doorway and reached a device that might have evolved in the junkyard of a machine civilization—all cracked screens and loose wires, apt to shatter at a touch. He adjusted a dial and studied the video image on the screen.
 
A shuttlecraft was landing on his farm.
 
Specifically, a Delta-class T-3c, all sharp angles and bare metal. It busily broadcast active scans of the landscape as its broad wings folded in for landing and its sublight engines tapered their thrust. Galen studied the associated readouts and let the specifications settle into his memory—not because they might be useful, but because he wanted to procrastinate for just a moment. To shut away the implications of what he was seeing.
 
He squeezed his eyes shut and gave himself three seconds, two, one.
 
Then it was time to accept that his family’s life on Lah’mu was over.
 
“Lyra,” he said. He assumed she was near, but didn’t turn to look.
 
“Is it him?” she asked. She sounded unafraid, which frightened Galen more than anything.
 
“I don’t know. But we have to—”
 
“I’ll get started,” she said.
 
Galen nodded without looking from the console.
 
Galen was not prone to panic. He knew what needed doing, had rehearsed it on those rare days when the farm tended to itself or on those less rare nights when sleep eluded him. Such preparations were the only obsessions he permitted himself. He turned to another machine, tapped in a code, and tore a series of cords from the wall with swift jerks. He began another countdown in his head; if the data purge did not complete in five minutes, he would begin physically destroying components.
 
He heard footsteps at the front door, quick and light. He turned to see Jyn dash inside, brown hair matted and face touched with dirt. She’d left her toy in the fields. Galen felt an unexpected pang and feared—absurdly, he knew—that the loss of Stormy would distress her once she was far from the farm.
 
“Mama—”
 
Lyra stepped away from the bundle of clothes and datapads and portable meals she’d piled on one chair and knelt before the girl whose pale, slender features mirrored hers. “We know. It’s all right.”
 
Galen approached the pair, waited until his daughter had seen him. He spoke softly but somberly. “Gather your things, Jyn. It’s time.”
 
She understood, of course. She always did, when it mattered. But Galen had no time to be proud.
 
He turned back to his machines as Jyn sprinted to her room. The data purge had not completed. There were other files he had to handle as well, files he should have erased on Coruscant but which he’d brought to Lah’mu instead. (Why had he done that? Was it nostalgia? Misplaced pride?) He opened a drawer stuffed with spare droid parts and removed the arm of an agricultural unit. He flipped open a small panel, dug his fingertips between wires, and extracted a datachip.
 
“The scrambler, please?” he said.
 
Lyra passed him a metal orb the size of his palm. He inserted the datachip and—before he could doubt himself—pressed the toggle. The orb heated and produced a smell like burning hair. He tossed it in the junk drawer and felt a tightness in his stomach.
 
“If there’s anything else, make it quick.” Lyra’s tone was clipped. A light blinked faster on the sensor console.
 
“Set the rendezvous and take Jyn,” he said. “I’ll finish here.”
 
Lyra abruptly stopped double-checking her bundle of provisions. “That wasn’t the plan, Galen.”
 
“I’ll meet you there.”
 
“You have to come with us.”
 
Her eyes were hard. Please smile, he thought.
 
“I have to buy you time,” he said.
 
The sensor light went dark. A fault seemed unlikely.
 
Lyra just watched him.
 
“Only I can,” he said.
 
It was an argument impossible to refute. Lyra didn’t try. She stalked into the kitchen and tapped at the comm unit as Galen made for Jyn’s room. He caught just a snippet of Lyra’s words: “Saw—it’s happened. He’s come for us.”
 
Jyn stood with her bulging satchel at her feet. Galen surveyed the tiny chamber’s remaining contents: a few toys, the cot. Easy enough to hide. Enough to buy a few more minutes. He pushed a doll out of sight before returning to the doorway.
 
“Jyn. Come here.”
 
He considered what he might say; considered what impression he wanted to leave Jyn if everything ended in disaster.
 
“Remember—” He spoke with deliberate care, hoping to etch the words in her bones. “Whatever I do, I do it to protect you. Say you understand.”
 
“I understand,” Jyn said.
 
And this time, of course, she didn’t understand. What eight-year-old could? Galen heard his own foolishness, his ego echoed by her voice. He wrapped her in his arms, felt her slender, warm body against him, and knew a better memory to leave her with.
 
“I love you, Stardust.”
 
“I love you, too, Papa.”
 
That would be enough.
 
He looked to his wife, who stood waiting. “Galen,” she began, all the harshness gone.
 
“Go,” he said.
 
She did, coaxing Jyn with her. Galen allowed himself the luxury of watching, heard his daughter offer a last confused, “Papa?” Then they were gone from the house, and he resumed his work.
 
He collected objects out of place—more toys, Lyra’s clothes, un- washed dishes from the kitchen—and stashed them in niches he and Lyra had prepared long ago. He checked the unfinished data purge, returned his mind’s eye to his mental countdown. A few seconds past the five-minute deadline. That meant he could keep busy while he awaited his visitors.
 
By the time Galen heard muffled voices approaching the farm-house, two of his homemade data processing units billowed acrid smoke as their circuits melted. He stepped out the front door to greet the new arrivals under the cloudy sky.
 
A company in bleached white and gleaming black advanced toward the doorstep. The leader was a narrow man of Galen’s own age in a spotless ivory officer’s uniform, head high and movements stiff. The breeze failed to disturb the sandy hair beneath his cap. His cohorts wore armor like a scarab’s shell, bore pistols and rifles as if ready for war. The troopers stepped when their leader stepped, matched his pace; to Galen, they seemed to exist only as extensions of their superior.
 
The man in white halted less than three meters away. “You’re a hard man to find, Galen,” he said, not quite smiling.
 
“That was the idea.” Galen did not quite smile, either, though he could have. He could have let the farm and sky fade, let the troopers become shadows, and conjured an office on Coruscant around him; allowed himself to believe he was sparring again with his friend and colleague Orson Krennic.
 
There was no point in nostalgia, however. Orson surely knew that as well as he.
 
Orson was tugging at his gloves as he studied the fields with an exaggerated crane of his neck. “But farming? A man of your talents?”
 
“It’s a peaceful life,” Galen returned.
 
“Lonely, I’d imagine.”
 
With those words, Orson had declared his game and his stakes. It did not surprise Galen.
 
“Since Lyra died, yes,” Galen said.
 
The corner of Orson’s mouth twitched, as if he were taken aback. “My sincerest condolences,” he said, then gestured to the troopers and spoke more sternly. “Search the house. Shut down any machines— we’ll want them examined by the technicians.”
 
Four of the troopers obediently, rapidly, made for the doorway. Galen stepped aside to allow them past.
 
“I don’t imagine,” Orson said, “you’ve laid any traps? Nothing that would harm a patriot doing his duty?”
 
“No.”
 
“No,” Orson agreed. “I’ve always found your constancy refreshing. Galen Erso is an honest man, unaltered by stress or circumstance.”
 
Troopers called to one another in the house behind Galen, and he stifled the impulse to turn. “Honest, perhaps. Still just a man.”
 
Orson spread his hands, conceding the point. He moved as if to join the troopers in the house, then stopped. “When did she die?” he asked.
 
“Two, three years, I think. It’s a bit of a blur.”
 
“She was a wonderful woman. Strong. I know you loved her very much.”
 
“What is it you want?”
 
The words were a mistake. Galen barely hid his wince as he heard himself, recognized the edge to his voice. The longer he played, the longer Lyra and Jyn had to escape. Instead he’d grown impatient.
                                      
 
Orson was replying carelessly, feigning the blunt honesty of a man too worn to lie. “The work has stalled, Galen. I need you to come back.”
 
“I have the utmost confidence in you. In your people.”
 
“You don’t,” Orson snapped. “You were never that humble.”
 
“And you have too little faith in your own skills,” Galen said easily. “I told you that when we were practically children. You could have done everything I did, but you preferred to dabble; to shepherd people instead of nurture theory. I always respected your decision, but don’t let it narrow your world.”
 
All of it was true. All of it was also designed to hurt Orson, to pry at his insecurities. Galen kept his tone measured, casual. Infuriatingly so, perhaps, but Orson’s fury did not frighten him. He feared focus, efficiency, speed; not wild rage.
 
Orson only grimaced—a forced smile that didn’t take. “You will come back.”
 
So much for that sidetrack. Galen straightened his back. They were coming to the end. “I won’t do it. This is where I belong now.”
 
“Scratching the dirt with a shovel? We were on the verge of greatness, Galen. We were this close to providing peace, security for the galaxy.”
 
 
Behind Galen came the sound of ceramics shattering as the troopers continued their search. He mentally cataloged dishes and ornamental vases, then dismissed the list. Nothing in the house mattered.
 
“You’re confusing peace with terror. You lied about what we were building.”
 
“Only because you were willing to believe.”
 
“You wanted to kill people.”
 
Orson shrugged, unmoved by the argument. “We have to start somewhere.”
 
Galen almost laughed. He remembered when he could laugh with Orson, instead of feeling nothing but hollow defiance.
 
Snapping sounds from the house. Furniture being broken apart, hiding places revealed. Orson would have his proof momentarily.
 
“I’d be of no help, Krennic.” Needle him. Deny all familiarity. “My mind just isn’t what it was.” And now he could only talk, not try to persuade or to enrage or do anything more than buy a few more seconds, a few precious moments for Lyra and Jyn. “I thought at first it was only the work—I would sit some nights and remember equations and theorems, but I couldn’t hold them in my head anymore. I chalked it up to exhaustion, to forgoing the habits of a focused intellect . . .” He shook his head. “But it’s more than that. Now I have trouble remembering the simplest things.”
 
Orson wove gloved fingers together, eyes glittering with cruel amusement. “Your child, for example? Galen, you’re an inspired scientist, but you’re a terrible liar.”
 
Orson didn’t need his troopers to report an extra bed or a toy left out in the fields. There would be no more delays for Galen, no hope of hiding his family’s presence on Lah’mu.
 
He prayed that Lyra would fare better. She had never failed him before.
 
Galen put aside even that thought to picture his daughter in her arms.

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4.7 out of 54.7 out of 5
911 global ratings

Top reviews from the United States

Heather Hiesterman
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
One of the best Star Wars Novelizations
Reviewed in the United States on December 20, 2016
Honestly, one of the best SW novelizations I''ve read, tied only with Revenge of the Sith. The book is not merely a "based on the movie" but would be a great addition to the SW canon even if it had never been filmed. Instead of merely regurgitating the movie... See more
Honestly, one of the best SW novelizations I''ve read, tied only with Revenge of the Sith. The book is not merely a "based on the movie" but would be a great addition to the SW canon even if it had never been filmed.
Instead of merely regurgitating the movie script with a few deleted scenes thrown in, Alexander Freed (Battlefront: Twilight Company) fleshes out the story and characters, explaining their motivations and inner conflicts in ways a movie cannot. Freed explains why Jyn is the way she is and her motivations are more chaotic than they seem in the movie. Cassian seems way more conflicted than I got from the character in the movie. The death scenes for Chirrut and Baze delve deeper into their friendship. Bodhi''s arc and damage from the tentacle creature isn''t handwaved away. Just great Star Wars writing.
And one of the absolute best things of the book are the bits of "Supplemental Data" sprinkled throughout. Everything from a page from a history of Jedha to bitchy memos between Tarkin and Krennick to the best, most hilarious: a series of memos between Galen and Death Star middle management.
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K. Marie
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Fast-paced; Insightful; Totally made me cry
Reviewed in the United States on December 30, 2016
I rarely write reviews but I''m doing so today because I honestly want everyone to read this incredible novel. I could gush over it for hours- the writing is absolutely masterful and I feel so much more connected with the characters that I did during the film. I loved the... See more
I rarely write reviews but I''m doing so today because I honestly want everyone to read this incredible novel. I could gush over it for hours- the writing is absolutely masterful and I feel so much more connected with the characters that I did during the film. I loved the actors in the movie, don''t get me wrong, but they did more fighting than talking. So this is the way to finally see inside the characters'' heads, if you will, to truly understand their motivations and their worries and their dreams. This novel is worthy to be canon and thank you Alexander Freed for writing a masterpiece.
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Gravity's Gone
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Good look into some character motivations, especially if you see the movie first
Reviewed in the United States on October 3, 2017
Well written novelisation of the movie. The book will likely be more entertaining if you watch the movie first. The movie was so fast-paced that it left little room for any in-depth character development, and with this being a stand alone movie, the most likely source to... See more
Well written novelisation of the movie. The book will likely be more entertaining if you watch the movie first. The movie was so fast-paced that it left little room for any in-depth character development, and with this being a stand alone movie, the most likely source to delve deeper into the characters was the novelisation and storylines carried out on related books. In this sense, the book does a fair job, leaving plenty of room for other off-shoot novels to pickup and carry these characters'' backstories. I must admit, while a fan of the movies, I have read very little in the realm of Star Wars fiction. I thoroughly enjoyed the Rogue One movie and several of the new characters, though, and wanted to get a better look at some of the characters.

The book gives insight into some of the character''s motivations for their actions, which during the warp speed trajectory of the movie were mostly vague, and sometimes seemingly odd. The book not only delves into the consciousness of Jyn, but also delves into brief person perspectives (of various portions of the storyline) from most of the movies main characters, including the antagonist Director Krennic. Krennic''s right-Hegelian viewpoint and power lust are actually entertaining and not too overly simplistic. The one first person perspective I would criticize to some extent is that of Vader in the Epilogue. While Star Wars is the story of Vader, his best qualities stem from his mysteriousness. To circle back to my original reasoning for reading the book, I was very drawn to the Saw Guerrera character in the movie, and this is one expectation of the book that fell a little flat. Even though Saw was only a small part of the movie, his character seemed incredibly interesting. The book, however, while at times seemingly trying to create some complexity of character, mostly falls flat. Saw is obviously extremely radical, no thought as to why. Saw is extremely militant, with the only justification of being a radical. I suppose this leaves plenty of strong lines to pick up regarding Saw, or maybe there are already some, but his character still seemed flat. The book does portray him as an it more viscous than what can be deemed in the movie, but I wonder at times if this truly even fits what he is supposed to be, being that guerrila leaders must rely on a volunteer army and a supportive populace for success.

Warning the final paragraph contains some spoilers, so turn back now if you haven''t seen the movie. One final thought on Rogue One, applying both to the book and film, is that the overall realism injected into this story gives it tremendous appeal. The realism which I am referring to is not a reference to any of the obvious fantasy, but refers to the less than perfect image of the rebellion. Don''t get me wrong, the Empire remains as evil, totalitarian, and statist as ever, but this film is the first to drop the pure black and white good versus evil fairy tale nature, and add complexity to the "good guys". The original triology was fairly straightforward - the Empire cared nothing for the individual inhabitants of the galaxy and would slaughter them by the planetful, whereas the rebellion fought for freedom from oppression. This movie removes the silly veil that the rebellion is composed completely of good guys, simply because the Empire is obviously bad. Juxtaposed against the Luke Skywalker version of the rebellion (who would never leave a man behind and would risk the entire rebellion to save his friends), Captain Andor is easily willing to slaughter a fellow dissident informant in cold blood, to prevent his potentially falling into the hands of the Empire (not to mention the fact that he was also still planning to assisnate Jyn''s father, even after this action seemed to have lost any net benefit for the Rebellion, and seemed much more plausible that the man was likely an ally). Rogue One shows that the Rebel Alliance essentially functions as a State in and of itself, and therefore it suffers from the same political power struggles as any government. This realism does nothing to diminish the evil of the Empire, but it does add complexity to the story that is appealing. This is one of the reasons I found the Saw Guerrera character fascinating. Saw was too radical for the formal Rebel Alliance. He was a militant revolutionary, a dissident, and apparently someone unwilling to participate in the political power struggles of the Rebel Aplliance. Saw is fighting his own guerrila war against imperial oppression, and it certainly doesn''t appear he would be any more tolerant of an oppressive republic tan he was of the Empire. Although left totally undeveloped, Saw''s character leaves leaves the opening for a radical individualist, libertarian, possibly anarchist perspective in the galaxy (instead of simply being outcast from the alliance because he is too violent); which handled correctly could be an infinitely interesting central character for off-spin Star Wars fiction.
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J.A.
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A Quality Adaptation of a Decent Film
Reviewed in the United States on June 21, 2017
Film adaptations are always a gamble. Either the author sticks too closely to the film and just rehashes a story the reader has probably already experienced. Or the author adds a lot of supplemental material, some times that works and some times it doesn''t. Rogue One does... See more
Film adaptations are always a gamble. Either the author sticks too closely to the film and just rehashes a story the reader has probably already experienced. Or the author adds a lot of supplemental material, some times that works and some times it doesn''t. Rogue One does flesh out the characters to a greater extent, something the film did a pretty poor job of (even though I like the movie a lot). I''d say the larger issues with the book aren''t the author''s fault, but rather Lucasfilm and the movie itself. The story has a slightly odd structure to it, and never really comes across as organic. Of course, only 3 of the 8 films achieved that, and this story is still leagues better than the prequels or the Force Awakens adaptation.

It''s a good read, and I like Freed''s style a lot. With a different author this would have felt like slog to get through, but his pacing is consistent. Die-hard Star Wars fans will read this regardless, but I''d also recommend it to anyone who really liked the film. If you didn''t like the film I don''t think the novel will change your mind much.
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MarkTop Contributor: Star Wars
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
An Impressive Novelization of the Film
Reviewed in the United States on March 21, 2017
I was massively disappointed by Freed''s Twilight Company book. The characters were completely flat, indistinguishable, and the plot was moving at a snail''s pace--I put it down. So I approached his novelization of Rogue One cautiously--but here he has written an excellent... See more
I was massively disappointed by Freed''s Twilight Company book. The characters were completely flat, indistinguishable, and the plot was moving at a snail''s pace--I put it down. So I approached his novelization of Rogue One cautiously--but here he has written an excellent book. I would say that the great advantage this novelization of the movie has over the movie is the ability to get into character''s heads and see what they are thinking. At times I could sense I was reading something that wasn''t in the film, but overall this book doesn''t offer much that is extremely revelatory. I found out that Cassian was a Separatist before, which is really useful for me given my wondering what the Rebels would have thought about the Separatists. I learned a lot more about Jyn and where her thoughts were, which was especially fitting if you read Catalyst before this. The action was obviously a lot more impressive in the film, but that''s to be expected.

Overall, this is a good book, especially if you love Rogue One like I do.
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EvelynR
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Supplemental Data: You''ll learn more about the characters in Rouge One, except Jyn
Reviewed in the United States on June 16, 2017
So first, the "Rogue One" novels are my first "Star Wars" novels in decades. I can''t even remember the name of the last one I read except it had Luke Skywalker in it. I saw Rogue One in the theater (twice) and read Beth Revis''s book "Rebel Rising"... See more
So first, the "Rogue One" novels are my first "Star Wars" novels in decades. I can''t even remember the name of the last one I read except it had Luke Skywalker in it. I saw Rogue One in the theater (twice) and read Beth Revis''s book "Rebel Rising" before I read Alexander Freed''s novelization. First of all, there were many complaints that there wasn''t enough depth to the characters in the film. I didn''t have this problem. As in other reviews, the novel provided depth and insight to some characters such as K2SO, Bodhi, Chirrut Imwe, Baze and especially Mon Mothma. What I took issue with the characterization of Jyn. Here was a strong female character, for a change, and in the book she read like some teenage girl with a bad case of post-traumatic stress disorder who functioned in an emotional black hole. It took away her strength and her determination. I didn''t think Felicity Jones played her that way. I liked the way Beth Revis handled Jyn''s character which makes me wonder how she would have handled Jyn in this novelization. On the plus side, I enjoyed the "Supplemental Data" sections which added depth to the story.
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czz
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Good.
Reviewed in the United States on January 11, 2019
I loved Battlefront from alexander freed, and I hoped this would be good too. It follows the movie crazy well so there isn''t really a lot to make it stand out on its own. It has slight variations from the movie, but maybe different takes from the script made it to the... See more
I loved Battlefront from alexander freed, and I hoped this would be good too.
It follows the movie crazy well so there isn''t really a lot to make it stand out on its own. It has slight variations from the movie, but maybe different takes from the script made it to the film, can''t verify. I''ve been stalking this Alexander Freed guy from a respectful distance and I like his work. Battlefront was good. I want more from this writer. I strongly dislike some star wars stuff. I think this guy has a knack for properly setting the characters''s quirks so it isn''t so rediculous, remember how out of place Jarjar was? It was shocking. Would you ever put Jarjar in an interrogation room as either the cop or the perp? Tinker, Tailor, Jarjar, Spy? This guys knows better and it shows. It is a little disnified- where nobody bleeds and sex does not exist, we have feelings but not quite as raw and vulgar as a soldiers lives can be, it manages to skirt around a lot. But I''ll take it any day.
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sci teacher
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Excellent Addition to the Star Wars Canon (rebooted)
Reviewed in the United States on January 2, 2017
Summary: A faithful novelization for the Rogue One movie. Rogue One Note: Spoilers will follow, so if you haven''t seen Rogue One, stop reading, correct that ... then come back, buy the book, and read it a time or two. Additional Thoughts: - Not... See more
Summary: A faithful novelization for the Rogue One movie. Rogue One

Note: Spoilers will follow, so if you haven''t seen Rogue One, stop reading, correct that ... then come back, buy the book, and read it a time or two.

Additional Thoughts:
- Not too much differs from the movie, so if you''ve seen Rogue One and have favorite lines, they''re probably in here. That said, there are a few slight additions to dialogue that probably reflect stuff that ended up on the cutting room floor so the movie didn''t end up 4 hrs long.
- The descriptions are smooth and beautiful or vivid and dark when they need to be.
- I love that books allow one greater insight into the character''s thoughts and feelings that may or may not show up in the brief moments we get to see them on the big (or little) screen.
- Disney is two for two in terms of turning out high quality Star Wars movies. I admit to not reading The Force Awakens novelization because I didn''t like the author (his other Star Wars books were downright boring in my opinion.). So, I can''t compare the quality of the two, but this one is very, very high.
- The Rogue One movie is better the second and third times you see it because there is a tremendous amount of backstory that can be confusing during the first viewing. Reading the novelization first might help, but I think seeing the movie then reading the book might be more fun.
- The short exchanges between Galen and Krennic''s people are amusing. We also get a little taste of the rivalry between Tarkin and Krennic.
- Krennic''s kind of a fun bad guy to get to know along the way here.
- The portrayal of Jyn Erso, Cassian Andor, K-2SO, Bohdi Rook, Saw Gerrera, Baze Malbus, and Chirrut Imwe seems spot-on. The page-time for each character seems well balanced, which is quite a feat since there are a ton of characters.

Conclusion: A great book to read in between seeing Rogue One. (See the movie, read the book, see the movie :-)
26 people found this helpful
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Freya of Asgard
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A riveting novel
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on February 12, 2017
I loved the movie “Rogue One” and I think that this tie-in novelization is really good. The text is well written, the prose is flowing and it is an enjoyable reading. The book follows the movie plot quite closely and there are some interesting extra at the end of some of...See more
I loved the movie “Rogue One” and I think that this tie-in novelization is really good. The text is well written, the prose is flowing and it is an enjoyable reading. The book follows the movie plot quite closely and there are some interesting extra at the end of some of the chapters. These extra are presented as epistolary interludes that give further details on the Death Star building and on the Rebellion, especially on Mon Mothma. Characters are well sketched and especially Jyn and Cassian are traced in depth as well Galen Erso personal tragedy. It is a very gripping book and the final is as moving as in the movie. The edition is well-finished. A must-have for Star Wars fans!
11 people found this helpful
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AlaranTop Contributor: Doctor Who
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Stardust and the Death Star
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on June 6, 2017
This is a fairly strong novelisation of the film. It successfully manages to capture the spirit of the original whilst embellishing on the background and characterisation. It is a positive rendition that makes for an exciting read. The novel embellishes upon the characters...See more
This is a fairly strong novelisation of the film. It successfully manages to capture the spirit of the original whilst embellishing on the background and characterisation. It is a positive rendition that makes for an exciting read. The novel embellishes upon the characters quite well, even K2-SO and the usually allusive Mon Mothma. Understandably, the bulk of the material focusses upon the outlooks of Jyn, Cassian and Krennic; these three being the predominant characters of the story. The author has a strong understanding of both Jyn and Krennic and enriches both by providing an emotional depth that there wasn’t space for in the film to such a degree. Cassian, perhaps, isn’t so well grasped though, feeling at times somewhat different to that on onscreen. However, the author does provide a reasonably intriguing insight into his motivations. Pilot Bodhi Rook receives some great treatment from the author. His character is widely expanded and the reader is given more information on his background, his relationship with Galen and his motivations for defecting. Raddus receives a similar treatment, although not to the same degree. Despite the proclamation on the book that it contains deleted and extended scenes there really isn’t that much in the way of extra material. Certainly nothing substantial or of any relevance plot wise. What there is, though, are various interludes in the form of missives or communications. A lot of the time these aren’t particularly relevant or necessary and sometimes detract from the atmosphere and pacing. However, Mothma’s account of Jyn and views on the Clone Wars are worthwhile, often providing more of an insight into Mothma than their subjects. If you haven’t yet seen the film, the below contains possible spoilers. During the latter stages of the novelisation the author does a fine job with the antenna relay sequence. It is possibly here that he is most successful at getting into the mindset of Jyn and Krennic, providing an extra emotional charge. The slight re-arrangement of what takes place by having the Death Star seen in the sky slightly earlier adds to this. It also gives Krennic’s fate more of a sense of poetic justice. However, the full dramatic performance of the Vader scenes towards the end isn’t quite captured in the novelisation. The recount of the scene is a little flat and feels truncated. Vader lacks presence. Oddly, his earlier appearance is superbly realised. Having the scene portrayed through the eyes of Krennic, with his changeable moments of fear and bravado, really emphasises the terrifying nature of being in Vader’s presence.
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J. L. Carter
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Bought to read out as a bed time story book.
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on September 21, 2017
Other than some minor errors with grammar and spelling, this book is excellent. Reading it out loud as a bed time story has even had me in tears towards the end (which made story time a bit hard at times), I was genuinely surprised at just how emotive this story was. I felt...See more
Other than some minor errors with grammar and spelling, this book is excellent. Reading it out loud as a bed time story has even had me in tears towards the end (which made story time a bit hard at times), I was genuinely surprised at just how emotive this story was. I felt a real attachment to the characters, although the description of the how the pilot they spend ages hunting for, is lost at the end could have been better, he deserved better. Even with the clean language and connection to Star Wars, this is hardly a kids book though. In truth, no kids book has made me feel so sad at the end since Philip Pullman''s Amber Spyglass. This was my first Star Wars book and if they are all this good, story time is going to be exciting for me too for the next few months.
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John Hopper
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
decent novelisation, adds fairly little to the film version
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on December 23, 2017
I was prompted to read this novelisation after rewatching the Rogue One film earlier this week, after going to see The Last Jedi and getting in an annual Star Wars-y mood. This is a fairly workmanlike novelisation, with some additional background given for Jyn Erso and the...See more
I was prompted to read this novelisation after rewatching the Rogue One film earlier this week, after going to see The Last Jedi and getting in an annual Star Wars-y mood. This is a fairly workmanlike novelisation, with some additional background given for Jyn Erso and the complex relationship between her father Galen and Orson Krennic, but not a lot else. The sadness and tragedy of the loss of innocent lives, represented by the small girl Jyn (temporarily) saves from crossfire in a street battle in the Holy City of Jedha, comes across well, and the last twenty pages or so are moving, but otherwise this didn''t really catch light for me.
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Kate Coleman
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Excellent Adaptation
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on May 21, 2017
I''ve been bitten once or twice by film adaptations, but my fears were totally unfounded when it came to Rogue one. This is an excellent adaptation of a brilliant film. The author handles the character arcs beautifully, deepening what we know about Jyn, Cassian, Krennic,...See more
I''ve been bitten once or twice by film adaptations, but my fears were totally unfounded when it came to Rogue one. This is an excellent adaptation of a brilliant film. The author handles the character arcs beautifully, deepening what we know about Jyn, Cassian, Krennic, Galen, Baze, Chirrut and Bodhi, and even some of the more fleeting characters get a snippet of revealing backstory that adds to the emotion of the tale. His handling of description is great, and he even managed to pull off the appearances of the Droids in a convincing manner. This is a story about war, yes, but it is mostly a story about people, and the way that war shapes their personalities and ravages their lives. A thoroughly engaging read. I''m off to read Mr Freed''s ''Star Wars Battlefront'' next.
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Battlefront: Inferno Squad Catalyst Alphabet Squadron From a Certain Point of View
Set in the aftermath of Rogue One: A Star Wars Story, this action-packed prequel to the videogame Battlefront II introduces the Empire’s elite force: Inferno Squad. The prequel to Rogue One, revealing the origins of the Death Star in an intense tale of ambition and betrayal. Set after Return of the Jedi, Alphabet Squadron follows a team of veteran pilots as they struggle to defeat the Empire once and for all. More than forty contributors lend their vision to this retelling of A New Hope. Each of the forty short stories reimagines a moment from the original film, but through the eyes of a supporting character.

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Rogue popular One: new arrival A Star Wars Story online

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